Thursday, August 2, 2012

Technical Pen Take 3

Well I've decided to try the technical pen again. Last time I tried to find one no one seemed to even know what a technical pen even was. I do live in a city that is 20 years behind the times. I mean everyone here thinks AC/DC is a cool new band.

Last week someone posted some pictures on our Flames of War Canada Forum.  Little did I know that it was Glen Tarbet who was interviewed in the first Art of War book.  I always loved his style, and took the opportunity to find out how he does it.

He told me the exact pen that he uses and I went on the hunt.  This time I found the correct pen.

A Kor-i-noor with a 3x0/.25 tip

I decided to do one soviet grey coat, and see how it turned out.

Looks kinda goofy in the close ups, but I must say it looks pretty striking at arms length (the dreaded 3ft rule).  It is going to slow me down, my already slow infantry painting process, but maybe with some practice...
Thinking about doing all my strelkovy like this now.  The wife thinks it looks cartoony, but I'm finding at this scale the more contrast the better it looks on the table.

Let me know your thoughts.  

New way better?
Older Infantry for comparison

14 comments:

  1. Is that a test fig? Weird...

    Looks good. It will have a striking look at table distance so I think it will do what you're wanting. I can't wait to see a whole company of these.

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  2. Yeah a test fig? What's up with that???

    I'd have to agree. Looks a bit wonky up close but when I look at the picture from a few feet away the details are striking and there's no confusing what kind of weapon he is holding. I stick to brushes but I'm curious to see what you can pull off with this pen.

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  3. lol, ha I knew you guys would bug me about that.

    but its technically not a test fig. It is part of the strelkovy I'm painting. But I figured if I wreck 1 out of 80 figs no big deal to paint over it.

    So, I think I will do them all this way, and get them based. Then we should be able to get a better idea of how they will look on the table.

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  4. Well it is a very good "pilot" fig. Up close the contrast is too great with hilights and shades being too strong but from about 3ft it is just fantastic. That's my one beef with this scale is that I think some stuff I've done looks great but up close with a digital camera it is atrocious. Out of curiosity, what brown did you select for the rifle? It isn't as red as it should be but flows very well with the rest of the scheme.

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  5. I actually just use beige brown.

    I'm actually curious what people use for the "red brown". I wouldn't mind my rifles being a bit darker.

    I remember when I first started painting, I used to think man I figures look pretty good (in hindsite they really sucked) until I saw them through the digital camera. I couldn't believe how crappy they looked.

    Then when I got into airbrushing my stuff looked really good through the digital camera, but with the 3ft rule I could tell ZERO differance between my old stuff and airbrushed stuff.

    Thats why I think that is why I've always liked this "cartoon" style. The contrast will really stand out on the table...I hope.

    I did one platoon with the pen tonight...god strelkovy suck to paint.

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  6. I use beige brown for weapons as well. I think your lighting just makes the rifle look brighter than mine. I havn't started my strelkovy yet but I am dreading it. I am almost done with my spetsnaz finally and that's just 5 stands. Then I have to do 32 stands of strelk, 12 stands of smg, 8 stands of flamer, and then a million other stands, tanks, and guns? Ermahgerd what have I gotten myself into.

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  7. lol run away...run away.

    I started with Russians when I first got into FOW, before I knew anything.

    I totally regret it. If I would have done any sort of research I would have never collected soviets.

    I love playing them, but I hate painting them.

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  8. do I do a light wash anyway?

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  9. That's a tough call. The shading is already fairly strong so I'm not so sure a wash is really needed. I think what I like most about your model is that the black lines do a much better job than my brown wash lines to break up one brown from another. On my models I'm using a 3-1 brown/black wash that gives enriched shading and you can see different parts of the model from like 6 feet away but it's not as profound as yours already is. This is why I do pilot figs though :p. Would hate to paint 200 infantry and then decide I don't like it.

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  10. Maybe I've done too much black lining? maybe I just outline around belts and guns and stuff, but I use the wash to make the recesses of clothing dark?

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  11. I would say that the wife knows best, even if she doesnt. Its a safe call

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  12. I have always loved black-lining with technical pens. Looks great.

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  13. I hate to ask just a newb question, but what are you using to mount the fig onto the tee?

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    Replies
    1. i use white glue. easy to remove after. i tried sticky tac but its not strong enough.

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